Detail View: Archivision Base to Module 9: Intervention of the Sabine Women

Preferred Title: 
Intervention of the Sabine Women
Image View: 
Detail, Romulus, the king of Rome with youth in Phrygian cap and horses
Creator: 
Jacques-Louis David (French painter, 1748-1825)
Location: 
repository: Musée du Louvre (Paris, Île-de-France, France) INV. 3691
Location Note: 
Purchased 1819
GPS: 
+48.861045+2.335787
Date: 
1799 (creation)
Cultural Context: 
French
Style Period: 
Eighteenth century; Neoclassical
Work Type 1: 
painting (visual work)
Classification: 
painting
Material: 
oil paint on canvas
Technique: 
oil painting (technique)
Measurements: 
3.85 m (height) x 5.22 m (width)
Description: 
David's painting depicts a legendary episode from Rome's beginnings in the 8th century BCE. After the Sabine women had been abducted by the neighboring Romans, the Sabines attempted to get them back. David shows the Sabine women intervening to stop the battle raging beneath the ramparts of the Capitol in Rome. The painting is a masterful summary of the whole episode. Hersilia is leaping between her father Tatius, the king of the Sabines, on the left, and her husband Romulus, the king of Rome, on the right. David is using the subject to advocate the reconciliation of the French people after the Revolution. While he was preparing this painting, whose subject is Roman, David proclaimed, ""I want to paint pure Greekness."" He wanted to mark his transition from the severe, Roman style of The Oath of the Horatii (Louvre) with a new pictorial manifesto. (Source: Louvre Museum [website]; http://www.louvre.fr/)
Collection: 
Archivision Addition Module Eight
Identifier: 
7A1-DJL-L-A03
Rights: 
© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.