Detail View: Archivision Base to Module 9: Monument (The)

Preferred Title: 
Monument (The)
Alternate Title: 
Monument to the Great Fire of London
Image View: 
Context view
Creator: 
Christopher Wren (British architect, 1632-1723); Robert Hooke (British architect, 1635-1703)
Location: 
site: London, England, United Kingdom
Location Note: 
Monument Street and Fish Street Hill
GPS: 
+51.510134-0.085986
Date: 
1671-1677 (creation)
Cultural Context: 
British
Style Period: 
Neoclassical; Seventeenth century
Work Type 1: 
memorial column
Classification: 
architecture
Material: 
Portland stone; gilt bronze
Technique: 
construction (assembling)
Measurements: 
202 ft (height)
Subjects: 
allegorical; death or burial; historical; rulers and leaders; Charles II, King of England, 1630-1685; Great Fire, London, England, 1666
Description: 
As part of the rebuilding, it was decided to erect a permanent memorial of the Great Fire near the place where it began. Sir Christopher Wren, Surveyor General to King Charles II and his friend and colleague, Dr. Robert Hooke, provided a design for a colossal Doric column in the antique tradition. They drew up plans for a column containing a cantilevered stone staircase of 311 steps leading to a viewing platform. This was surmounted by a drum and a copper urn from which flames emerged, symbolising the Great Fire. The Monument, as it came to be called, is 61 metres high (202 feet) - the exact distance between it and the site in Pudding Lane where the fire began. It consists of a pedestal about 21 feet square and 40 feet high, with a plinth 28 feet square, and a fluted shaft 120 feet high and 15 feet in diameter; on the abacus is a balcony encompassing a moulded cylinder, which supports a flaming urn or vase of gilt bronze, symbolizing the Fire. The quantity of Portland stone contained in the column, as estimat
Collection: 
Archivision Addition Module Four
Identifier: 
1A1-WC-M-A1
Rights: 
© Scott Gilchrist, Archivision, Inc.